Children can write under or attract a snapshot of story elements to help in retelling the story come a caregiver.

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Editor’s note: While learning at home, children can make development toward grade-level reading and writing standards. This article is component of an ongoing series designed to aid caregivers support children’s and teens’ literacy discovering at home.

Children can show their listening and also reading comprehension by retelling stories that they check out or the are review to castle (Hogan et al., 2011). Once retelling a story, college student should be able to identify the characters, settings, and sequence of events. Below are interpretations of each element:

Character: A person, animal, or thing in a story the takes action.Setting: The time and also place the the story.Event: once one or much more characters carry out something or take it some sort of activity in a setting.Sequence: The stimulate of the occasions in the story (beginning, middle, and end).

Using a graphic organizer, such together the Sequencing graphic Organizer supplied in this write-up (see Supplemental materials for Families), can aid children remember to look for and also record the important aspects of a story. This retelling activity is specifically beneficial for kids enrolled in kindergarten through Grade 3, who space still finding out to know the facets of a story and also how they work together come create meaning (Stadler & Ward, 2003). Initially you might select publications that are less complicated for your kids to grasp so that their attention have the right to be committed to learning exactly how to identify the characters, settings, and also events. As your children demonstrate an knowledge of the story elements and how to document them ~ above the graphic organizer, you deserve to introduce more an overwhelming books that have brand-new ideas and also vocabulary.

Children who are not yet able to read a publication independently can watch and also listen come an adult read or listen to tape-recorded audio of the publication being read. However, children who are able should read the book independently. You deserve to have your kids stop regularly while analysis or listening to the story and discuss the characters, settings, and also events. See our previous short articles on Dialogic Reading and Caregiver Involvement because that information around how come ask questions while reading a book.

As story elements are identified, have actually your child document them on the graphic organizer. Kids can compose or draw pictures that represent the characters, settings, and events that occur in the beginning, middle, and end that the story.

After completing the graphic organizer, questioning your kids to verbally retell the story. They have the right to refer to the graphic organizer together a reminder the the story elements and the bespeak in which the events occurred. If your kids are able to compose in finish sentences, you have the right to have them exercise retelling the story by writing a an introduction (Gilbert & Graham, 2010).

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This sample Sequencing graphics Organizer to be completed ~ above the story Little Red speak Hood.


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Versions that Little Red speak Hood can it is in accessed with your windy library in digital or paper form, are available to review online and also in eBook kind via project Guttenberg, and are accessible in the adhering to recordings top top the web:

Supplemental products for Families

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Sequencing graphic Organizer

Children deserve to use this graphic organizer for recording the characters, settings, and events that a story. This graphic organizer can be used to help your child identify the elements while analysis or listening come a story. 

References

Gilbert, J., & Graham, S. (2010). Teaching writing to elementary students in qualities 4–6: A nationwide survey. The Elementary school Journal, 110, 494–518. Https://doi.org/10.1086/651193

Stadler, M. A., & Ward, G. C. (2005). Supporting the narrative advancement of young children. Early Childhood education and learning Journal, 33, 73–80. Https://doi.org/10.1007/s10643-005-0024-4